runwrite

I run, I write

25 notes &

And a selfie because I haven’t posted in a while. Hard to put my finger on what it is, but something isn’t in me to share. I’m on the wagon with food and exercise, but my blogging mojo has been nearly obliterated.

And a selfie because I haven’t posted in a while. Hard to put my finger on what it is, but something isn’t in me to share. I’m on the wagon with food and exercise, but my blogging mojo has been nearly obliterated.

Filed under emotional lackingmotivation life

2,281 notes &

You must make a decision that you are going to move on. It won’t happen automatically. You will have to rise up and say, ‘I don’t care how hard this is, I don’t care how disappointed I am, I’m not going to let this get the best of me. I’m moving on with my life.

Joel Osteen (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

Not a fan of Joel Osteen, but this is probably one of the most sensible things I’ve ever heard attributed to him. It takes a concerted and sincere effort to move on, to move on from missed opportunities, emotional trauma, deep rooted pain and hurt, whatever it is that you have to move on from will indeed take work. It won’t happen magically. Must remember this.

(via ironmanredux)

10 notes &

neon-spandex:

I’m wearing too many clothes and too many inches of natural insulation for this sudden switch to spring warmth & humidity.

To be fair, here in sunny Southern California, it’s pretty much been summer and summer lite (it’s currently 89 degrees), with a few hours (if that) worth of rain and a couple weeks of 50 and 60 degree weather serving as our winter. Let’s be real, there has been minimal transition to speak of. But, sometimes a girl (the girl being me) wants to pretend that it’s chilly outside and wear a long sleeved blouse and then decide to hop on the treadmill desk for a brisk 30 minute walk and I’m quickly reminded that my “natural insulation”(thank you neon-spandex for that perfectly apt term) in combination with my over active sweat glands in combination with this ridiculous long sleeved shirt is just plain silly.

Filed under calilife iwouldn't trade it tho at least I got active while at work

21 notes &

Compliments go such a long way, especially between women. We tear each other down so often or refuse to acknowledge each other. Today a woman at work, who I see frequently (though mostly in the elevator), told me she loved my shoes. Obviously in the scheme of life and such it’s not that big of a deal, but it made me feel good. This woman dresses impeccably and I always notice and admire from a distance. So her compliment meant that much more. Sometimes a lady needs a reminder that she’s a fab chick. Just because everyone can’t appreciate that doesn’t mean it’s not true. All of you ladies are fabulous—remember that.

14 notes &

GPOY and a music-less run. Last run was on Valentine’s Day. Not really a planned hiatus, but an unwarranted hiatus nonetheless. Today wasn’t awful. Actually shocking how not awful it was. I haven’t been inactive, spinning between 3-5 times a week, but running is a different and unforgiving beast.

Filed under running therapy runoutyourfeels

228,628 notes &

So, do it. Decide. Is this the life you want to live? Is this the person you want to love? Is this the best you can be? Can you be stronger? Kinder? More Compassionate? Decide. Breathe in. Breathe out and decide
Meredith Grey. (via positiving)

Yes!

(Source: whilde-daisi, via blankmoments)

93 notes &

In fact, the evidence suggests that welfare-state programs enhance social mobility, thanks to little things like children of the poor having adequate nutrition and medical care. And conversely,of course, when such programs are absent or inadequate, the poor find themselves in a trap they often can’t escape, not because they lack the incentive, but because they lack the resources.

The Real Poverty Trap (via azspot)

The thing with this is, Paul Ryan and those like him are not interested in helping people living in poverty.  I am not willing to say that Ryan thinks poverty is awesome, but I do think Ryan thinks people living in poverty deserve what they get; including children. 

Coming forward saying that a student whose last meal is Friday’s lunch and whose next meal is Monday’s breakfast, claims that they would rather not eat at all - is how they justify not helping alleviate the suffering of children.  

(via ashamedtosay)

Yep to everything stated here.

(via ashamedtosay)

Filed under isaywhatiwantonmyblog

134 notes &

TUMBLR I NEED YOUR HELP!!!!

themotherrunner:

I usually hate contest and I never want to spam you guys. But my design for the Another Mother Runner Treadmill Contest was chosen.

Here’s the deal, I have to run either in the morning when its dark or at night when its dark and I run on busy roads. I am scared to death of getting hit by a car…

Because even though I’ve never met Bonnie, I love her. She’s good peeps and I know her pain with regards to running. Let the good people get this one!

(Source: th3m0th3rrunn3r)

1,123 notes &

jtotheizzoe:

Is the science fair really that bad?
I’ve seen this pic shared a few times today, originally from someone named Susan Messina on Facebook. Susan and family clearly had a bad experience with the science fair and made a little joke out of it, but it got me thinking: Is it really that bad these days?
I know classroom schedules are more crowded than ever before, with less space for the free work and experiment time that it takes to really do a science fair project well, and most importantly, to enjoy it.
The experience of doing a science fair project can be an amazing early scientific experience, but it’s been a long time since I’ve been science-fair-aged, and I want to know:
Does your school or district still have a science fair? Is it required? Is it competition-focused? Is classroom time set aside to work on projects? Is it valuable? Is it fun? Should it be improved? How?


My daughter turned in her science project last Friday. And I would like to say that this picture/post 100% accurately describes our project. I say “our” because I was as invested as she was and on the eve if turning it in, I had my own work to do, an article to write, and we, by no means, waited until the last minute. But nonetheless, I stayed up to help her get the project done and at the end of the night, or shall I say morning, I think we both bordered on denouncing and disowning one another. As for my article it was hastily completed minutes before it was due. I’m sure the project has its value, but honestly the stress was just too great.My daughter is very smart, her teachers tell me she excels at nearly everything, that she exhibits great leadership skills. She gets excellent grades and has performed at the top levels on standardized testing. I am a proud mother and the credit for her brilliance can hardly go to me. But the science fair and science projects are just a beast that I’m not sure the children (or me as a parent) are truly prepared to take on. If any child has the aptitude to be an actual scientist, by God, it most definitely is my daughter. But the science fair has become just another notch to add to the academic belt and less of an experiment that can be an introduction to the awe and wonder of science.

jtotheizzoe:

Is the science fair really that bad?

I’ve seen this pic shared a few times today, originally from someone named Susan Messina on Facebook. Susan and family clearly had a bad experience with the science fair and made a little joke out of it, but it got me thinking: Is it really that bad these days?

I know classroom schedules are more crowded than ever before, with less space for the free work and experiment time that it takes to really do a science fair project well, and most importantly, to enjoy it.

The experience of doing a science fair project can be an amazing early scientific experience, but it’s been a long time since I’ve been science-fair-aged, and I want to know:

Does your school or district still have a science fair? Is it required? Is it competition-focused? Is classroom time set aside to work on projects? Is it valuable? Is it fun? Should it be improved? How?

My daughter turned in her science project last Friday. And I would like to say that this picture/post 100% accurately describes our project. I say “our” because I was as invested as she was and on the eve if turning it in, I had my own work to do, an article to write, and we, by no means, waited until the last minute. But nonetheless, I stayed up to help her get the project done and at the end of the night, or shall I say morning, I think we both bordered on denouncing and disowning one another. As for my article it was hastily completed minutes before it was due. I’m sure the project has its value, but honestly the stress was just too great.

My daughter is very smart, her teachers tell me she excels at nearly everything, that she exhibits great leadership skills. She gets excellent grades and has performed at the top levels on standardized testing. I am a proud mother and the credit for her brilliance can hardly go to me. But the science fair and science projects are just a beast that I’m not sure the children (or me as a parent) are truly prepared to take on. If any child has the aptitude to be an actual scientist, by God, it most definitely is my daughter. But the science fair has become just another notch to add to the academic belt and less of an experiment that can be an introduction to the awe and wonder of science.

(via ilovecharts)

Filed under parenting my daughter scienceisnotmyfriend